captured: america in color from 1939-1943

Barker at the grounds at the state fair. Rutland, Vermont, September 1941.



loved THIS article by the denver post



These images, by photographers of the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information, are some of the only color photographs taken of the effects of the Depression on America’s rural and small town populations. The photographs are the property of the Library of Congress and were included in a 2006 exhibit Bound for Glory: America in Color.



Backstage at the "girlie" show at the state fair. Rutland, Vermont, September 1941.



At the Vermont state fair. Rutland, Vermont, September 1941.




Couples at square dance. McIntosh County, Oklahoma, 1939 or 1940




Children asleep on bed during square dance. McIntosh County, Oklahoma, 1939 or 1940.



School children singing. Pie Town, New Mexico, October 1940.




A crossroads store, bar, "juke joint," and gas station in the cotton plantation area. Melrose, Louisiana, June 1940.




Two young employees of another local "juke joint" in the cotton plantation area. Melrose, Louisiana, June 1940.




Women workers employed as wipers in the roundhouse having lunch in their rest room, Chicago and Northwest Railway Company. Clinton, Iowa, April 1943.




Children stage a patriotic demonstration. Southington, Connecticut, May 1942.




At Beecher Street School. Southington, Connecticut, May 1942.




Woman is working on a "Vengeance" dive bomber Tennessee, February 1943.




Rural school children. San Augustine County, Texas, April 1943.




Rural school children. San Augustine County, Texas, April 1943

4 comments:

buddens said...

That is so cool, I love it! Especially the Vermont pictures because we lived there for five years and it holds a special place in our hearts. It's crazy how seeing color photos of that time period makes everything look more realistic. It's always so hard to imagine some of the photos I'm accustomed to seeing of that era as being real. The color is incredibly fascinating. Great find! (as usual :)

R-Eight said...

Really incredible pictures. at first glance I thought they were recreations. They almost look wrong in color. Love it!

Amy said...

Oh... These pictures made my history lovin' nerd alert heart sing! I think I will do some kind of research project on them... Just kidding. But, I did look at each one of them for a long time and try to think what was going on in the country at that time. I am such a geek! GREAT POST!

gina bina said...

I am completely captivated by the photographs of black people in the south, I would love to know the story behind each of their lives. However, my favorite picture of the series would be #6 of the men and women reading the headlines from a street corner window in December. Notice the headline that reads "Flying Santa Behind Schedule." Absolutely perfect. Thanks for sharing this, I got a little choked up with American pride.